Archive for April, 2014

Cool free stuff!

Posted in Creativity, Manufacturing Improvement, Uncategorized with tags , , , , on April 2, 2014 by manufacturingtraining

In many of our courses we teach people about the many free references and other information available on the Internet for use in reliability predictions, FMEA preparation, product design, cost estimation, and other areas in which we teach and consult.   We’re including a partial list of these free resources on the ManufacturingTraining blog for your easy reference.   There will be more of our favorites here on the blog, so check back often (or better yet, hit the RSS button to subscribe).

Electronic Equipment Reliability Data.   MIL-HDBK-217F has been the “go to” source for electrical and electronic equipment reliability data for decades (I first learned about it when preparing reliability predictions for Honeywell’s military targeting systems in the 1970s).   It’s a comprehensive failure rate source, and perhaps just as significantly, it includes environmental modifiers to tailor a prediction to your system’s operating environment.   MIL-HDBK-217 also includes directions for performing an electronic equipment reliability prediction.   You can download a free copy of MIL-HDBK-217F here.

217

Galvanic Corrosion Prevention.   Corrosion is an expensive problem, and its annual cost has been estimated at $270 billion dollars in the US alone.   That’s a whopping $1,000 for every man, woman, and child in the United States!   One of the principal contributors to corrosion is galvanic corrosion, which can occur if the wrong metals are in intimate contact.   If you’re concerned about potential reactions between metals in your designs, MIL-STD-889B is the US standard for defining what’s acceptable and what’s not.   You can download a free copy of MIL-STD-889B here.

889

Procedures for Performing an FMEA.   Failure Modes and Effects Analysis is a superior tool for alerting the design team of potential failure modes during the development process.   We teach an FMEA course that receives high marks from all who have taken it, and one of the topics we address is how FMEA was first developed by the US Department of Defense just after World War II for use in new program development.   MIL-STD-1629 has been superceded by commercial FMEA standards, but it is still the defining document for performing FMEAs, and you can still download a copy for free.   It’s available for free here.

1629

System Safety Procedures.   There are a family of system safety analyses similar in concept to Failure Modes and Effects Analysis but focused exclusively on safety issues. These include Preliminary Hazard Analyses, Subsystem Hazard Analyses, System Hazard Analyses, Common Mode Analyses, and Operating Hazard Analyses.   MIL-STD-882D addresses all of these and more.   You can download a free copy of MIL-STD-882D here.

882D

Gantt Chart Excel Software.   H.L. Gantt, an industrial engineer, developed the Gantt chart scheduling approach that bears his name during World War I to keep track of large projects.   He hit a home run with this one.   It’s the “go to” approach used throughout the world, and it makes it very easy to rapidly determine if a program is on schedule.     I don’t much care for Microsoft Project, as its Gantt charts tend to be tough to manage and nearly impossible to portray in a Word or PowerPoint file.   I’ve found Excel to be much easier to use, and to import into a Word document or PowerPoint presentation.   You can download a free Excel template for Gantt charts here.

GanttExcel

That’s it for now.   Keep an eye on this blog, as we’ll be adding more free stuff in future posts.

 

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